Connecting fractured habitats has long-lasting ecological benefits, study in Science finds

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A study of habitat connections in South Carolina provides the “best scientific evidence that corridors work as they are intended.”

A decades-long ecological experiment in South Carolina has shown the power of a straightforward way to improve wildlife habitats: connect them. Scientists say the study’s results, published Thursday in the journal Science, offer the most compelling evidence yet that connected habitats flourish for years.

Landscape corridors are strips of undeveloped or restored land that link isolated habitats.

Source: Connecting fractured habitats has long-lasting ecological benefits, study in Science finds – The Washington Post