Tag Archives: Bees

This bumblebee still absent from Mount Ashland

The bee has a black back but is without a yellow face. Could it be a Franklin’s bumblebee, which hasn’t been seen in these parts since 2006? A college student quickly nets the bee and channels her two days of bee-wrangling experience to get the little bugger into a plastic canister. “Nope, I can tell […]
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The Super Bowl of Beekeeping

Every February, white petals blanket first the almond trees, then the floor of the central valley, an 18,000-square-mile expanse of California that begins at the stretch of highway known as the Grapevine just south of Bakersfield and reaches north to the foothills of the Cascades. The blooms represent the beginning of the valley’s growing season […]
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Wild Bees May Benefit From Cleaning Up After Clearcuts

After cutting down trees in a section of forest, logging crews can do their local bees a favor by sticking around to clear the debris and flatten the ground. A recent study from Oregon State University suggests that removing timber harvest residue — also known as “slash” — could help wild bee populations thrive in […]
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Franklin’s still missing

Sabrina Vladu sees a fluffy little buzzer land, and for a minute she thinks it’s possible that little bumblebee is the reason two dozen people armed with bug nets are here stalking Mount Ashland’s wildflower meadows. The bee has a black back but is without a yellow face. Could it be a Franklin’s bumblebee, which […]
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Wild bees are attracted to blue fluorescent light, Oregon State University research finds

Researchers at Oregon State University are all abuzz. They’ve discovered that wild bees are attracted to a specific wavelength of blue fluorescent light. That could potentially improve pollination rates for the 100 food crops that depend on bees to the tune of $15 billion a year. Source: Wild bees are attracted to blue fluorescent light, […]
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Column: It’s time to understand and embrace neonicotinoid insecticides

Neonicotinoids, because of lesser toxicity than other insecticides, became widely used in urban landscapes and on farms. Neonicotinoid insecticides aren’t the problem for bees that activists have made them out to be. In fact, years of monitoring show proper use of neonicotinoids doesn’t harm bees. But a combination of issues do negatively impact bee health, […]
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Native Bees And Alfalfa Seed Farmers, A NW Love Story

Walla Walla Valley farmers have cultivated some 18 million Northwest native pollinators called alkali bees to help their alfalfa grow. It’s one of the most unusual partnerships in agriculture. Walla Walla County might just be the only place on Earth where you have to brake for bees. “You can see the signs here,” says Mike Ingham, […]
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Bumblebee Blues: Pacific Northwest Pollinator In Trouble

Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northeast seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species. Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for both wild and agricultural plants, but some species have disappeared from places where they were once common, possibly because of the same factors that have been killing honeybees […]
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Nation’s largest solar apiary a sweet collaboration in Eagle Point

A cross-country collaboration between a Rogue River beekeeper and other sustainable energy companies broke a sweet record this past week. John Jacob, owner and founder of Old Sol Apiaries, moved 48 honeybee hives onto the Eagle Point property owned by Pine Gate Renewables, where the bees will take up residence in a carefully planned neighborhood of […]
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Pacific Northwest bumblebees in trouble

Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species. Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for both wild and agricultural plants, but some species have disappeared from places where they were once common, possibly because of the same factors that have been […]
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