Tag Archives: Economic Impact

Time to take action to limit summer fires

When I attended Ashland High School in the 1980s, we looked forward to summer as a time to play in our great outdoors. It’s a Southern Oregon tradition. But in recent years, the average size, frequency, and severity of wildfires has been increasing. Air quality in Oregon has been among the worst in the nation […]
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From Steel Imports To Subarus, Trump’s Tariff War Hits SW Washington

In Washington, the Trump administration’s trade tariffs are having a huge impact across the state — from cherry growers in eastern Washington to steel imports at the Port of Vancouver. For many at the Port of Vancouver, the impacts of President Trump’s escalating trade war are already here. That’s the message U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., […]
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Visitor volume dips on the Oregon Coast

  Tourism spending at an all-time high. At the height of summer, it is easy to believe every Oregonian has found their way to the Oregon Coast. But while figures from the 2018 Oregon Travel Impact report show tourism spending has increased, the number of visitors staying in hotels and rentals dipped slightly on the […]
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Shady Cove tourist dollars up in smoke

Jeff Ewen prods at the halved chickens sizzling on the grill as heat rises off the metal to meet already-hot and still air. In a week when Shady Cove saw air quality reach “very unhealthy” or “hazardous” levels six days, residents and visitors have taken refuge. But not Ewen. Tuesday through Saturday, he fires up […]
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Wildfires: A Preliminary Economic Assessment

In the midst of another severe wildfire season, lets take a look at some of the potential channels in which economic problems may materialize in the future. This preliminary assessment is something our office put together a year ago and was originally published in our December 2017 forecast document but never here on the blog. […]
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Oregon economy would be a trade-war casualty – Opinion

Oregon’s economy relies on its ability to invest and trade in global markets. However, a trade war decreases demand for the state’s valuable exports — mostly high-value agricultural products like seafood, forest products, grain, wine, potatoes and beef exported primarily to markets in Asia. Tens of thousands of Oregon jobs stand in the crosshairs. Source: […]
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More farms, ranches embracing agritourism –

Opening to the public provides an enjoyable, educational and profitable additional business for many farms and ranches. White wooden-block letters on the side of a large red barn near this small town in Oregon’s Willamette Valley spell out the name of one of the state’s most popular agritourism destinations. Source: More farms, ranches embracing agritourism […]
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Writer’s Notebook: Oregon farmers will feel Trump’s trade war

Trade policy is a complex web of relationships that move in both directions. Beneath the level of congressional anguish over tariffs and the prospect of trade war, American farmers are taking a hit. Mostly that’s happening in the soybean fields of the Midwest. But Oregon agriculture will not be on the sidelines. Source: The Daily […]
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OIT wins $3 million grant to open Scappoose site

The U.S. Commerce Department’s Economic Development Administration has announced a $3 million grant to the Oregon Institute of Technology of Klamath Falls to build a manufacturing and training facility in Scappoose. OIT’s proposal estimated the project would create 978 new jobs, retain 512 jobs and spur $692 million in private investment. Source: OIT wins $3 […]
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Mid-Valley InBusiness: Ag feels the effects of ongoing trade disputes

Cousins Ryan and Wade Glaser are fourth-generation family farmers who work fertile land in the Willamette Valley first planted by their great-grandfather. They have 1,300 acres near Lebanon, growing mostly grass seed, but also perennial rye grass, peas, white clover, some fescue, flax, soft white wheat and canola. The farmer has to be an optimist […]
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