Tag Archives: Office of Economic Analysis (OEA)

Middle-Wage Jobs Are Almost Back (2018 Job Polarization Update)

Job polarization is the academic term for when high-wage and low-wage jobs grow quickly while good-paying, family-wage jobs bear the brunt of recessions and don’t tend to come all the way back in expansions. Now, some of these changes in the labor market are good news, like the growth in high-wage jobs which has lead […]
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Future Economic Growth in Oregon | Oregon Office of Economic Analysis

Economic growth over the long run is determined by the number of workers and how productive they are. The main reason Oregon outperforms the typical state over the entire business cycle is our stronger population growth. In particular, the influx of young, skilled households boosts our economic potential as our working-age population increases faster than […]
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Oregon’s Income Distribution | Oregon Office of Economic Analysis

Oregon’s income gains this expansion are among the best in the nation, as our office has highlighted in recent years. The state’s median household income now matches the U.S. for the first time since the mills started closing in the 1980s. The single largest factor underlying this growth is the strong labor market. For individuals and households […]
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Oregon Exports, Strong Dollar and Trade Tensions

The Port of Portland, in conjunction with Business Oregon and our office, just put out a press release covering the latest trends for Oregon exports. There is a lot of good nuggets of information included in the release. Do read the whole thing. Our contribution largely related to the impacts, or lack thereof, of the tariffs […]
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Long Commute? In Portland, You’re Not Alone.

New data show the number of Portlanders who commute more than 90 minutes each way to work has increased drastically over the past decade. Getting to work in the morning in Portland is a practice in patience. New data show the city is becoming a hub of “super commuters”—people who spend more than 90 minutes […]
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Urban Wage Premium, Pacific Northwest Edition 

New research from MIT’s David Autor has set the economics profession on fire in recent months. The reason is it furthers our understanding of the impacts of job polarization, wage stagnation and the implications this has on migration and the urban-rural divide. What follows is a summary of his new research through a Pacific Northwest lens. A […]
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Industrial Diversification in Oregon

Last month we examined industries and regions in Oregon that grow faster (or slower) and are more volatile (or stable) than the overall economy. Today we follow up with a look at industrial diversification and how that has changed over time in Oregon. First, when we look at industrial diversification, economists typically look at how many […]
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For Oregon Millennials, a College Degree Is Often a Ticket Out of State

Those who relocate—both moving in and moving out of Oregon—are more often educated than those who remain. New Census Bureau data reviewed by state economists shows that Oregon’s millennial residents continue to earn bachelor and graduate degrees at rates much higher than older generations, falling in line with national trends. Source: For Oregon Millennials, a […]
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Educational Attainment Continues to Increase 

A few years ago we looked at educational attainment across generations here in Oregon. What it showed is that educational attainment is increasing over time. That is, Millennials are obtaining college degrees at higher rates than Gen X which did so at higher rates than Boomers and the like. In the latest Census data these trends continue. […]
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Economic and Revenue Forecast, March 2019

This morning the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis released the latest quarterly economic and revenue forecast. For the full document, slides and forecast data please see our main website. Below is the forecast’s Executive Summary. The U.S. economy experienced strong economic growth in 2018. Unemployment remains near historic lows even as participation rates rise. Wage […]
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