Tag Archives: Office of Economic Analysis (OEA)

Friday Beer Thoughts and One Last 2020s Prediction: Closures

One last prediction for the 2020s: Oregon will see more brewery closures. In fact we are likely to see a dozen or more closures every year in the decade ahead. This is mostly due to the fact that Oregon has seen considerable growth in the number of breweries in the past 10-15 years. More breweries means […]
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Predictions for the 2020s

Welcome to a new decade. The 2020s should be the best decade so far in the new millennium, not that the tech bust/housing bubble/Great Recession and its aftermath puts up much of a challenge, but still. While the most remarkable economic trend of the 2010s was the lack of a recession, we know the business […]
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Housing affordability worsened in Oregon in last decade with low construction rates

Despite Oregon’s strong economy, a state economist called the last a decade a “disappointment” as the state recovers from the Great Recession. Despite Oregon’s widespread housing shortage, the amount of housing built in the state during the last decade reached a record low. That was one of the unexpected conclusions state economist Josh Lehner included […]
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The Housing Shortage in Profile – WSJ

State Library Ed. Note: State employees can access this Wall Street Journal story HERE via the State Library’s subscription to the US Newstream database. Alternatively, state employees can contact us for access: library.help@state.or.us or 503-378-8800. Construction in Oregon dropped to the lowest level since World War II. Politicians bemoan the lack of affordable housing, but their policies often […]
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Economic Trends of the 2010s (Graphs of the Decade)

Economically, the 2010s were a disappointment. Now, the U.S. economy went the full 10 years without a recession, a first in history. However we began the decade at the bottom of the worst recession in a long time. As such much of the decade was about regaining the lost ground. That means we spent most […]
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Aging Oregon Part 2: Improving Health

Welcome back to the occasional series where our office will explore some of the demographic, economic, and societal impacts of an aging population. Previously we looked at overall demographic trends, while today we dig into our generally improving health. Future posts will examine the impacts on income, tax revenue, housing markets, retirement homes, their workforce […]
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Initial Claims Remain Low (Graph of the Week)

Recently our office has brought up initial claims for unemployment insurance a few times, including at the most recent forecast release. The reason was Oregon’s initial claims have been running higher in 2019 than in 2018 throughout much of the year. Now, the increases were more like 5% increases relative to last year and we […]
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Labor Supply and Oregon’s Slower Job Growth 

As our office developed our latest forecast, we dug into Oregon’s slower employment growth. As discussed previously, we highlighted three main channels in which the slowdown could materialize: worsening current economic conditions, uncertainty over future growth, and tight labor markets. We tried to spell it out more clearly in our forecast document and during our […]
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Oregon Workforce and Economic Information: Oregon Employment Forecast: Solid Fundamentals, More Uncertainty

The U.S. economic expansion turned 10 years old this summer, making it the longest expansion in recorded history. Locally, Oregon continues to add jobs and our unemployment rate remains at or near record lows. In addition, incomes are rising and initial claims for unemployment insurance (a measure of layoffs) are down. All told, the state’s […]
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Openings, Layoffs, and Net Job Gains

When economists talk about growth, we almost always are referring to net growth. There is considerable amounts of churn in the economy every single day. Roughly, 12% of jobs are either being gained or lost at any given point. What we’re concerned about is whether the good news outweighs the bad news, or vice versus. Even though […]
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