Tag Archives: Water Resources

Washington drought grows; Ecology has $2 million for relief

As drought spreads in Washington, the Department of Ecology is preparing to make $2 million available for drought-relief projects. A moderate drought covers more than one-third of the state, triple the area from two weeks ago, the U.S. Drought Monitor reported Thursday. Source: Washington drought grows; Ecology has $2 million for relief | Water | […]
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Warm, rainy spring cuts Central Oregon snowpack in half

Experts warn the rapid snowmelt could lead to an earlier fire season. Rapid snowmelt and a rainy April combined to melt off the central Cascades snowpack at a rapid rate, opening up mountain recreation areas for summer while also widening the swath of land susceptible for forest fire. Since late April warm weather has lowered […]
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Forecast: Water supplies across Oregon mixed

Oregon farmers and ranchers can expect mixed irrigation supplies heading into summer after months of fast-changing weather. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service released its statewide water outlook report for May, predicting near- to above-average stream flows in eastern and southern Oregon, and near- to below-average stream flows in central and western Oregon. Source: Forecast: […]
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Douglas County completely drought-free for first time in almost a year ahead of summer

After several substantial winter and early spring storms, Douglas County is completely drought-free for the first time in almost a year, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. The monitor — a service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and several other agencies — reported no areas of drought in its weekly update on April 9. […]
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Fishing season in full swing in Central Oregon

Many high Cascade lakes are now accessible and fishing well. Significant late-winter snowfall and early-spring rain should make for a promising trout fishing season this year on Central Oregon lakes and rivers. “I think it’s going to benefit fish, and it’s going to help out water supply,” said Brett Hodgson, a Bend-based fisheries biologist for […]
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Guest column: Protect Central Oregon’s historic canal system

Within the city limits of Bend, we are blessed to have inherited the iconic Deschutes River, which snakes gracefully through our town. In addition, canal water is diverted from the Deschutes River for irrigation, creating more scenic waterways, wildlife habitats and serene hiking trails. Visitors marvel at our abundant water resources and are surprised by […]
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How will climate change affect Eastern Oregon?

Climate change is here: It’s time to talk about adaptation. Last week, I attended a meeting in Enterprise with range specialists, ranchers and Joseph Band Nez Perce people from the Colville reservation. The topic? Tracking and managing the precariousness that climate change is bringing to our local rangelands. Summers in Oregon are trending hotter and […]
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Editorial: Willamette reallocation bears close monitoring

Somehow, in a valley that gets an average of 55-plus inches of rain a year, farmers could find themselves facing a water shortage at some point in the future. We should add that any shortages would be courtesy of the federal and state governments. Currently underway is a government effort to divvy up the water […]
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Klamath Project water delivery set at 92%

Bureau of Reclamation will deliver at least 322,000 acre-feet of water — or a 92% allocation — from Upper Klamath Lake to the Klamath Project this summer and fall. The official number was announced last week by Jeff Nettleton, manager of the agency’s Klamath Basin Area Office, at the Klamath Water Users Association’s annual meeting. […]
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Guest column: Canal piping is not enough

On April 6, The Bulletin ran a front-page story about Arnold Irrigation District applying for a $48 million grant to pipe its main canals and subsequently wrote an editorial in support of this. AID would join other local irrigation districts in efforts to conserve water, much of which will be returned to the Deschutes River. […]
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