Category Archives: New York Times

A $76,000 Monthly Pension: Why States and Cities Are Short on Cash

Governments are struggling as mounting pension obligations crowd out the rest of their budgets. Oregon faces a severe, self-inflicted crisis. A public university president in Oregon gives new meaning to the idea of a pensioner. Joseph Robertson, an eye surgeon who retired as head of the Oregon Health & Science University last fall, receives the […]
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Many People Taking Antidepressants Discover They Cannot Quit

Victoria Toline would hunch over the kitchen table, steady her hands and draw a bead of liquid from a vial with a small dropper. It was a delicate operation that had become a daily routine — extracting ever tinier doses of the antidepressant she had taken for three years, on and off, and was desperately […]
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In 83 Million Eviction Records, a Sweeping and Intimate New Look at Housing in America

  Before the first hearings on the morning docket, the line starts to clog the lobby of the John Marshall Courthouse. No cellphones are allowed inside, but many of the people who’ve been summoned don’t learn that until they arrive. “Put it in your car,” the sheriff’s deputies suggest at the metal detector. That advice […]
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‘I Can’t Stop’: Schools Struggle With Vaping Explosion

The student had been caught vaping in school three times before he sat in the vice principal’s office at Cape Elizabeth High School in Maine this winter and shamefacedly admitted what by then was obvious. “I can’t stop,” he told the vice principal, Nate Carpenter.

A Student Loan Fix for a Teacher, and Many Other Public Servants

In October, I wrote a column about Jed Shafer, a teacher in Oregon who found himself on the wrong end of the student loan repayment bureaucracy. Mr. Shafer thought he was following the rules to qualify for the public service loan forgiveness program, and spent years communicating carefully with the loan servicers who collected his […]
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E.P.A. Prepares to Roll Back Rules Requiring Cars to Be Cleaner and More Efficient

The Trump administration is expected to launch an effort in coming days to weaken greenhouse gas emissions and fuel economy standards for automobiles, handing a victory to car manufacturers and giving them ammunition to potentially roll back industry standards worldwide.

A Billionaire and a Nurse Shouldn’t Pay the Same Fine for Speeding

If Mark Zuckerberg and a janitor who works at Facebook’s headquarters each received a speeding ticket while driving home from work, they’d each owe the government the same amount of money. Mr. Zuckerberg wouldn’t bat an eye. The janitor is another story.

Hepatitis C Drugs Save Lives, but Sick Prisoners Aren’t Getting Them

Any national campaign to eliminate hepatitis C, an insidious virus that kills tens of thousands of Americans a year, would almost certainly involve prisons. One in seven state inmates are believed to be infected, and the regimented environment of a prison has its advantages when it comes to screening and treatment.

It’s True: False News Spreads Faster and Wider. And Humans Are to Blame

What if the scourge of false news on the internet is not the result of Russian operatives or partisan zealots or computer-controlled bots? What if the main problem is us? People are the principal culprits, according to a new study examining the flow of stories on Twitter. And people, the study’s authors also say, prefer […]
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An Oregon Mill Town Learns to Love Facebook and Apple

New “hyperscale” data centers from the tech giants, part of a wave of global development, helped lead Prineville to a path of recovery. A decade ago, when five shuttered sawmills and 20 percent unemployment defined Crook County, Ore., nobody envisioned that the path to recovery would be tied to Facebook and Apple. Source: An Oregon […]
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